Tiramisù for JOSM preview

Tiramisù for JOSM preview

I’m releasing today a preview of Tiramisù for JOSM. It’s a set of four styles that combined give almost the same look of my Mapsforge theme. Since JOSM supports cascading style sheets these are not full themes, but rather modules. They complete the built-in Potlatch 2 theme that is necessary for a proper display. I also recommend the “Hide nodes” theme from the standard JOSM repository.

It is meant to ease the work on OSM for outdoor activities (hiking and biking in particular), and to show land use and natural elements in a meaningful and intuitive way.

I’ve been using it for a while, and despite being a little incomplete it seems to me that it works ok. Eventually I’ll upload it to the official JOSM repository, but I think it still needs some testing before.

Tiramisù base

This is the base module, providing land use, accommodation, buildings and amenities.

Tiramisù hiking

This one provides the styling for tracks and paths, and shows the tracktype and SAC scale tagging. The full path visibility scale is also shown.

Tiramisù MTB downhill

This one provides the styling for tracks and paths, and shows the mtb:scale tagging, also for single nodes. Visibility is not considered.

Tiramisù MTB downhill

This one provides the styling for tracks and paths, and shows the mtb:scale:uphill tagging, also for single nodes. Visibility is not considered.

Install

Download the zip file, expand it in a folder on your hard drive. The fire up JOSM, go to the “Map paint” preferences tab and load the four “.mapcss” files. A proper order is important for things to work well. On the top of the list you need “Potlatch 2”, then “Hide nodes” (if you use it). The Tiramisù modules follow, in any order. Please note that only one between hiking and MTB sub-themes should be active, otherwise they interfere (actually the last one should prevail, but I haven’t evaluated all the possible combinations).

Comments

As usual, comments are more than welcome. English, Italian, French accepted. As usual, the link is on the the top of the page, and don’t ask me why…

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Tiramisù 1.0 released

It’s been a long wait but eventually I’m releasing the 1.0 version of Tiramisù. Nothing really changes from the latest RC, but I’m giving it a static URL rather than referring to blog posts. You can also download the Inkscape SVG files with all the icons and patterns.

This will be the last version for Mapsforge 0.3. The next Oruxmaps version will switch to 0.5 which changes quite a lot of, and I will focus on that.

Enjoy!

Tiramisù cycle beta1

Eventually I did it… the cycle version of Tiramisù is here. Actually, it’s a very preliminary version, but it should mostly work ok.

The base theme

The cycle theme draws paths according to the MTB tags when available. The colour scheme is the same of the hiking version, I just added a darker brown for MTB 0 (SAC starts from 1). Untagged paths are shown in grey, at higher zoom levels the SAC scale is shown with bullets up to T3. T4 and above are a dotted thinner line, T5 and T6 have transversal red and black bars to show they aren’t suitable for bikes. I chose to differentiate T4 because (if you happen to be a vertrider…) it is sometimes rideable, and also because there is a number of mistagged paths that are actually in the T1-T3 range.

Tracks are rarely tagged for MTB, so I left the basic tracktype classification unchanged. When there is MTB tagging available it is shown in form of dashed core with rounded linecaps. Colours are the same used for paths. To help differentiating higher grades have shorter and more spaced dashes.

Uphill scale is shown in the form of a circle drawn on top of the path/track. Colours match the ones used for downhill. I stole this from Dsvilko’s Simply Hike theme.

The predictive “Oronzo” version

I don’t really know how this is going to end up, but I wanted to try to interpret the available data to guess MTB difficulty on paths where the MTB scale is absent. The idea is to automate the mental process I’m doing anyway when I look at a map without MTB indications.

Analysis on tag usage on tagwatch (just before it died) showed a certain correspondence between SAC and MTBscales, that sort of confirms experience on the terrain. For example amongst the trails with a T1 SAC classification 62% have a MTB 1, 26% are MTB 2. So, as a base I match the two scales, adding a bias in case of bad trail visibility (that usually means not so rolling terrain).

Codenamed “Oronzo” this isn’t a working theme at the moment, but a proof of concept for testing.  It only shows paths that have both SAC and MTB tagging and some basic land use for orientation. A line is drawn according to the real MTB scale. The colours are the same of the main theme, except MTB 0 which is green to stand out more. On the top of that two concentric circles are drawn: the inner one shows the SAC scale, the outer one the SAC+visibility bias. When the line colour coincides with the circles the system works, else you can check how much it screwed up.

Anybody with a lot of time to waste can pan around to check how well it works and share his opinion. :-)

What’s missing

Quite a few things. The final (distant) goal is to have a theme that is complete for cycling, both off and on road, showing everything relevant. At the moment network routes aren’t shown, nor are restricted accesses. Cycleways should be better highlighted, too.

I’m also not really happy with the rendering. There is simply too much stuff to show at once. It’s difficult to differentiate things enough to be easy to distinguish at a glance and at the same time avoid a total mess of colours and symbols… The great news is that Mapsforge 0.5 will have modular themes and much more control on line-symbols which will solve the problem (I hope). Until then I think this is more or less the best I have to offer, but I’m open to suggestions.

Download

You can download the files here. It’s just the xml, drop it alongside the regular theme you can get here.

Tiramisù 1.0 RC ready to test

It took a bit longer than anticipated, but eventually Tiramisù 1.0 Release Candidate is here. I feel it’s complete and it seems to work ok, so unless some bugs show up this is the final one (until the next OpenAndroMaps big update, that is…).

What changed and why

Full SAC scale

OpenandroMaps from January 2014 support a few interesting new things. Above all the full SAC scale and the trail_visibility parameter.

There has been a bit of debate about the opportunity of showing the full SAC scale, stopping at T4 or removing the T4-T6 range. While every position has its merits, I eventually decided that it is better to show all the grades for the following reasons:

    1. T4 may be challenging for some, but still doable with bare hands, while T5 and T6 may require tools and climbing equipments. Merging everything in one class may push some people to underestimate  the higher grades.
    2. Hiding the T4-T6 range altogether would have side effects. Due to some unfortunate choices in OSM and general people laziness there is quite a bit of mistagging, with easy trails classified as T4.

Anyway, just like before, a dashed black line means “take care, that’s difficult an possibly dangerous terrain”. If the background is light brown it’s T4, orange T5, red T6.

Trail visibility

We now have trail visibility information included in the maps, where available. Excellent to good visibility is represented with a continuous line, intermediate to bad is dashed, horrible or no visibility is dotted.

And what where the information isn’t available? Both the original SAC scale definitions and statistical data suggest that T1 and T2 generally have good visibility while T3 is mostly intermediate, so I assumed these as defaults. I used a light brown background for T3 when I’m using it by default rather than reading an actual value.

For T4 to T6 visibility is always assumed to be bad, so I ignored the tag even if present .

Huts & C

The new maps brought a complete support for huts, bivouacs, shelters, with winter rooms and so on. Enjoy the new icons. Labelling of huts works now much better thanks to the code once again I shamelessly stole from Tobias’ Elevate.

New stuff

A bunch of shops have been added (convenience, marketplaces, butcher, laundry, DIY).

Plus block barriers are now shown and fountains with drinkable water are light blue rather than brown. It’s funny that the icons for fountains have been there since forever, but I always forgot to add the necessary code… I’d really like if someone could confirm that it works, since I couldn’t find that case on the map.

Small bug fixes and enhancements

I removed the border from natural reserves at lower zoom levels, because it showed artefacts at tile borders. Tunnels are now more visible, especially for paths. There were duplicate instructions that caused road names to appear twice, that’s fixed. Aerialways now appear at zoom level 14 rather than 15. Colours for tertiary roads and tracks changed slightly to avoid some confusion.

A proper legend

I built a PDF legend, optimized for small displays. I suppose that the maps are intuitive enough, but still… you may want to save it somewhere on the phone for quick off-line access.

What’s missing

I liked the idea of showing guideposts only if they have a reference attached, in order to use them for orientation when the GPS is kept off for some reason. Otherwise they are pretty much useless and just clutter the map. For reasons that I still don’t understand it didn’t work, so for the moment I just removed them.

And of course the bike version… it’s in the works, but it will take some time.

As usual please test and let me know how it works for you in the comments (the “leave a comment” link is at the top of the page). Italian, English and French accepted.

How to install

First download the zipped theme file.

This version is deprecated. You should get the newer one instead.

Then follow the standard instructions at the OAM website.

When done, open the Oruxmaps settings and change the mapsforge text multiplier (Settings->Maps and scroll way down) to anything that makes the text readable on your screen. As a rule of thumb 1.0 for 200 dpi, 1.5 for 300 dpi and 2 for 450 dpi is a good start.

Then check the default zoom level (Settings->Maps->Zoom settings->Default zoom) and set it to 100%.  Oruxmaps has the arguable feature of setting it to higher values by default on high density displays. This makes a lot of sense for raster maps, but makes vector ones look jagged, so you really should set it back to 100%.

There are two XML files in the zips. The “GP” one has tweaks for Geopaparazzi, the other is the standard one for Oruxmaps, Cruiser, etc.

Tiramisù 1.0 beta available

Tiramisù is getting close to the final release…

What changed and why

Land-use is back

I previously removed a lot of land-use patterns with the goal of cleaning up the map background, probably too much. After quite a bit of work they are back. I hope that I found the right balance between completeness and clutter. Thanks for the push, Tobias.

Forests are now lighter to be less intrusive and grass is put behind everything else: bad mapping with overlapped land-use should be less of a problem.

Seamless patterns

Patterns are now seamless by themselves and fit evenly in MapsForge’s 256x256px tile size. They should look much better now in every situation.

Fixed water ways (hopefully)

Pipelines should now appear only if overground. Water bodies are now opaque to prevent river axis from showing through. In some lakes it looked really bad.

Contour lines

I had problems to see contour lines in forest areas, so I made them a little thicker and darker starting from zoom-level 15.

Steps and bridges

Steps and paths on bridges are now uniformed to the general style (they retained Elevate’s style before).

Tracks

Grade 2 tracks have now a uniform light brown/yellowish core. Grades 3 to 5 have a dashed brown colour: the darker and the shorter the dash, the higher the grade. Just like before, but the difference is now more visible. Thanks for the push, Fabrizio.

Network highlighting

Hiking networks’ highlighting is less transparent than before to be more consistent with different backgrounds.

Low-density displays support (sort of)

There are now three versions of Tiramisù, they work independently and can coexist side by side. The only real difference is symbols size, everything else is the same. In the LR version some symbols are a little too blurred: fixing that at this stage is too much work, I’ll do it with the final release. Meanwhile you can test the icon’s size.

What’s missing

Not much. I’m waiting the new OpenAndroMaps to add full SAC scale to paths, and complete hut classification. I hope to have the final release before the end of January. Meanwhile please test and let me know how it works for you in the comments (the “leave a comment” link is at the top of the page). Italian, English and French accepted.

How to install

First download the zipped theme file.

This version is deprecated. You should get the newer one instead.

  • Tiramisù 1.0 LR beta (Suggested for 200 dpi devices)
  • Tiramisù 1.0 beta (Suggested for 300 dpi devices)
  • Tiramisù 1.0 HR beta (Suggested for 450 dpi devices)

Then follow the standard instructions at the OAM website.

When done, open the Oruxmaps settings and change the mapsforge text multiplier (Settings->Maps and scroll way down) to anything that makes the text readable on your screen. As a rule of thumb 1.0 for 200 dpi, 1.5 for 300 dpi and 2 for 450 dpi is a good start.

Then check the default zoom level (Settings->Maps->Zoom settings->Default zoom) and set it to 100%.  Oruxmaps has the arguable feature of setting it to higher values by default on high density displays. This makes a lot of sense for raster maps, but makes vector ones look jagged, so you really should set it back to 100%.

Tiramisù, a new theme for Oruxmaps and OpenAndroMaps

And here it is, Tiramisù, a new mapsforge theme for using OpenAndroMaps in Oruxmaps (and compatible apps).

Based on the highly appreciated Elevate theme from Tobias Kuehn it is primarily aimed at bikers and mountain hikers with high density displays on their phones. This is a preliminary (beta) release; in my testing it just works, but I’m interested in knowing how it works for other people, so I’m making it public.

Waiting for a proper legend here are a few hints and a brief list of what I changed and why.

High resolution graphics

Starting from well known icons collections and adding some of my own, I drawn a new symbol set in SVG that I then rendered at different resolutions. Unfortunately mapsforge can’t automatically switch resolution so, waiting for scalable theme support in the next version, there are actually two themes, the standard one for 300 dpi devices and the HR one for 450 dpi. Other than the linked images the themes are identical.

I haven’t had the chance to test it on smaller phones, it may work or not.

Higher contrast

I increased a lot the contrast between different stuff to have a better readability in outdoor conditions. My Galaxy Nexus’ screen isn’t that bright for outdoors usage, and this makes a real difference.

Progressive rendering

Patterns scale while zooming in to keep their dimension in proportion with the rest. Buildings and residential areas are darker when zoomed out to make small hamlets and villages stand out better, and lighter when you zoom in, in order to make symbols more legible.

Paths and tracks widths and dash strokes scale too.

Simplified landuse

Some landuse patterns have been removed or joined to reduce visual clutter. Vegetation in particular is reduced to trees, scrub, and cultivation (orchards and vineyards).

New color scheme for tracks and paths

I usually don’t care much about trail classification, but sometimes knowing the difficulty of a path or a track (within the limits of OSM accuracy…) can be handy, for example to compare two nearby alternatives.

I render all paths in the T1-T3 range using a continuous line. T1 is brown, T2 red and T3 orange. Line thickness changes slightly, too. The idea is to have a similar aspect, while still being able to distinguish the SAC scale value if needed. T4-T6 paths and ferratas are rendered as a dashed black and light brown line to make out that’s serious stuff. Unclassified paths have a brown-orange dash stroke.

Grade 1 tracks are rendered like minor roads, just a little smaller. Grade 2 to grade 5 have a light yellow and brown dash stroke. The higher the grade the darker the brown and the longer the yellow dash. Unclassified tracks have a dotted red core.

MTB scales are expressed in form of a number in a circle, visible only at higher zoom levels. The number on the top is the uphill grade, the number on the bottom is for the downhill.

More discrete rendering of hiking and cycling routes

I also usually don’t care much about network routes. So I use a subtle highlighting, red for hiking and blue for cycling. The idea is to make it just visible enough without getting in the way when you don’t care about it.

Workaronds for Mapsforge quirks

Mapsforge is unpredictable in many ways. In particular symbols often randomly appear and disappear at different zoom levels without apparent logic. I render a semitransparent red circle behind huts and shelters, and an cobalt one behind water sources (including fountains). Most of the times when the symbol is killed, the circle is not, so you still know there is something in that point. It doesn’t always work, but it’s still better than nothing.

The disclaimer

OpenStreetMap is full of errors. Mapsforge is quirky.  And I’m not any better.

While things generally work well enough, there may be situations where wrong data or a wrong interpretation can lead to dangerous situations. Be careful, gather as much information as you can and please be kind: when you find an error don’t complain, go to the OSM website and fix it when you get back home. Or at least leave a note for the others, someone else will take care.

How to install

First download the zipped theme file.

This version is deprecated. You should get the newer one instead.

Then follow the standard instructions at the OAM website.

When done, open the Oruxmaps settings and change the mapsforge text multiplier (Settings->Maps and scroll way down) to anything that makes the text readable on your screen. As a rule of thumb 1.5 for 300 dpi and 2 for 450 dpi is a good start.

Then check the default zoom level (Settings->Maps->Zoom settings->Default zoom) and set it to 100%.  Oruxmaps has the arguable feature of setting it to higher values by default on high density displays. This makes a lot of sense for raster maps, but makes vector ones look jagged, so you really should set it back to 100%.

And…

Did I forget anything? just tell me in the comments (the “leave a comment” link is at the top of the page; very smart , WordPress, very smart…).

Italian, English and French accepted.